COMPETITIVE DIVIDEND RATES

Just as we must weigh the constructive possibilities inherent in our association policies, so too must we be aware of and carefully analyze the eventual results of plans and procedures which may in the end be liabilities — ^possessed of and having attached to them negative or actual detrimental influences to our business in its entirety. What proves to be harmful to our business in general must in the ultimate reflect itself upon and be disadvantageous to our individual associations in their operations. Speaking as an association executive, one cannot help but view with less equanimity than some the tendency on the part of a relatively few of our institutions to secure savings funds through the use of individuals classified as brokers or by dividend rate advertising far beyond the normally accepted areas of operation. There is no longer any question in my mind that the middlemen who have attached themselves to us tend by their pursuits to champion a type of thinking and public relations which appear to the vast majority as unsound and unproductive of lasting good. Certainly all of us appreciate the necessity for an awareness of and a continual attention to the development of strong loss reserves. Is it possible that long-distance, high-dividend-rate advertising and brokers, directly or indirectly advocating greater dividends in the face of already low and declining money rates on investments, can have an end result which is not injurious to our business?